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Facts stranger than fiction.. 14

Guinness World Records, known from its inception in 1955 until 2000 as The Guinness Book of Records and in previous United States editions as The Guinness Book of World Records, is a reference book published annually, listing world records both of human achievements and the extremes of the natural world

Guinness World Records, known from its inception in 1955 until 2000 as The Guinness Book of Records and in previous United States editions as The Guinness Book of World Records, is a reference book published annually, listing world records both of human achievements and the extremes of the natural world. The brainchild of Sir Hugh Beaver, the book was co-founded by brothers Norris and Ross McWhirter in Fleet Street, London in August 1954.

The book itself holds a world record, as the best-selling copyrighted book of all time. As of the 2019 edition, it is now in its 64th year of publication, published in 100 countries and 23 languages. The international franchise has extended beyond print to include television series and museums. The popularity of the franchise has resulted in Guinness World Records becoming the primary international authority on the cataloguing and verification of a huge number of world records; the organisation employs official record adjudicators authorised to verify the authenticity of the setting and breaking of records

Sir Hugh Beaver, the managing director of the Guinness Brewery, was part of a hunting party in 1951. There, all the hunters had an argument regarding the fastest game bird in Europe. Everybody had a different answer and they were unable to find the correct answer in any reference book.

In 1954, Sir Hugh Beaver recalled this argument and embarked on a journey to create a book that would help settle similar pub arguments. He invited twin brothers, Norris and Ross McWhirter, to compile the book of facts and figures. The McWhirter brothers were fabulously fanatical fact-finding researchers. After an initial phase of research, the brothers sat down to compile the book. Little did they know that they were creating one of the most famous books in the history of mankind.

It has been over 60 years and the Guinness Book of World Records continues to be the best seller every year.

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Originally published: 1955Author: Craig GlendayPublisher: Jim Pattison GroupGenre: InformationEditor: Norris McWhirterOriginal languages: Persian, Hindi, Korean, Romanian, Tagalog, Lithuanian, Azerbaijani Guinness World Records website publishes selected records and is not supposed to be used for the record verification purposes, as it explains: “There are more than 40,000 current records in our database and we try our best to feature as many as possible online. We currently include over 15,000 records online which we update every week, so make sure to check the site regularly!” The book printed annually contains only 4,000 records. The only way to verify a record is to contact Guinness, and the average response time is twelve weeks For some potential categories, Guinness World Records has declined to list some records that are too difficult or impossible to determine. For example, its website states: “We do not accept any claims for beauty as it is not objectively measurable. On 10 December 2010, Guinness World Records stopped its new “dreadlock” category after investigation of its first and only female title holder, Asha Mandela, determining it was impossible to judge this record accurately

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Shobha Iyer View All →

Always be Happy; always wear a Smile, Not because Life is full of reasons to Smile, but because your Smile itself maybe a reason for many others to Smile ;The Greatest Thing In Life Is Love And The Second Is Laughter..

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