Changes

Don’t scare of change.

Life is all about change.

You’ll change.

Everybody will change.

Everything will change.

Look around you, you’ll always find changes.

You can’t stop the medium of change.

Nobody can stop it either.

Change is the universal law.

This is the truth of life.

Source: POSITIVE THOUGHTS OF SELF-MOTIVATION! Only you can motivate yourself… Only you can bring positive changes in your life…. Birister Sharma

To Buy this Book- POSITIVE THOUGHTS OF SELF-MOTIVATION!

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You didn’t deserve!- #Vanilla’sBlog

You didn’t deserve…

You didn’t deserve that attention I gave;you were just attracted to a girl so brave.

You didn’t deserve the time I gave you more than anyone else;you were just passing your time making a mess.

You didn’t deserve my thoughts for you day and night;you were already planning with someone else.

You didn’t deserve the bond of friendship I was in with you;you just said dialogues of friends forever,that’s never true…..

Read Full Post Here ☟☟☟

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The Contrast Of Loving Your Job

A man doing his job.

Author and anthropologist David Graeber mentioned in his book ‘Bullshit Jobs’, that today’s work features a lot of needless busywork and it’s preventing people from making a meaningful contribution to the world.

Maybe the modern quest for future unemployment comes from the fact that many jobs seem meaningless and unfulfilling. However, I have been wandering with this topic of ‘meaningful’ and ‘meaningless’ work for quite some time. Like, do I love my job? Is my job really bullshit?

For many years, I have lived my life arguing that most jobs are meaningless, this includes most of my own job as well. Only after failing my first start-up and having gone through unemployment, I can safely say that the only thing worse than working is not having a job. This made me reframe my perception of ‘meaningless’.

The Pleasure Of Work

During the time of my unemployment, I had all the time to reflect on my own thoughts and actions. For many years, I have asked myself daily whether my job has meaning or a sense of purpose. I was breaking my head trying to find a fulfilling answer, but I eventually came to the point of “No, it was neither meaningful nor fulfilling, but I did have fun.” It’s weird but that thought was quite uplifting.  

Looking back on my previous jobs, I actually did enjoy them and of course, some more than others. Eventually, enjoyment is what got me to do what I do now, which is writing. And because I get pleasure from writing, as a result, it gives me a sense of purpose. I initially thought that the job itself gave me a sense of purpose, but it’s not. It’s the pleasure of work that gave me a sense of purpose.

Yes, that’s right, the pleasure of work. In the moment of doing, meaning doesn’t matter, just the task at hand. That’s a break from my usual thought dwelling on the bigger picture of who I’m meant to be and what I should try to achieve in my life. When I’m working, I’m doing what’s needed.

When you perform your task well, you’re successful in your own way, big and small. That feels temporarily great despite that you may not change the world, but your approach to it makes a meaningful difference in how you and those your work with feel. Of course, people share different views on whether the pleasure of work is meant for everyone.

Puzzle Of Survival

Ryan Avant argues in The Economist’s 1843, that the pleasure of work lies partly in the process of losing oneself in a puzzle with a solution on which other people depend. He believes that the average wage service workers don’t have access to the same kind of pleasure. The puzzle we’re all constantly solving is survival, ideally by minimising both friction and conflict and maximising positive relations.

For example, when a hotel staff opens the door and offers to carry your heavy luggage to your room. Even though it doesn’t change the course of humanity, but it sure is nice and it makes you appreciative of the person doing the job. The staff earns a wage by solving the puzzle of carrying your luggage and hopefully making their share of the world run smoother.

There’s dignity in doing whatever must be done and having the appreciation for occupation.

However, work isn’t completely satisfying when you’re paid a lot and feel a bit arrogant about your wonderful position. Low-paid work may be undervalued societally, but it’s critical to everyone, and we all know it. Every job has some possibilities, but sadly not recognised by snobs.

In Need To Make A Living

John Danaher shared an interesting view in The Philosopher’s Magazine, saying that all this talk of jobs and purpose is exactly the problem with postmodern society. He defines work as “the performance of an activity for economic reward or in the hope of receiving some such reward.” Also,  believing that work is bad because many employment contracts allow employers to undermine worker freedom. However, because jobs are not securely held, workers accept this difficult position as they need to make a living.

But as anyone who has been under- or unemployed, knows that much worse than work is to worry about its absence. Stressing over how to pay for food and shelter, doubting when or if you’ll work again, and avoiding to spend money leaves little to no mental space for creativity and is more dreary than nagging about your boring job.

For most of us, work is necessary. Treating our working years as a kind of hell and dreaming of early retirement isn’t going to make life any more fun. So, you’re better off learning to live, work, and play now.

Contrast Is Key

“Clay is made into vessels; but it is on their empty hollowness, that their use depends. The door and windows are cut out to form a house; but it is on empty space, that its use depends. Everything is shaped by nothing,” according to Lao Tzu, a Taoist sage. Labour gives leisure time more quality because you push yourself on the job that makes having days off to spend time with friends, family, or even alone really enjoyable.

Besides, whatever your job, it has some satisfying aspects. Even if it only lets you pay your way, you can find ways to appreciate even the most boring jobs. Perhaps with time, you will find a more interesting job to spend your time working. But for now, dwelling continually in unhappiness will only build-up more unhappiness and make you less likely to find your way. Even if you’re not naturally passionate about, for example serving cranky customers, or reading corporate law documents, you can discover that these parts present fascinating discoveries and solutions as well.

What I want you to think about is that your work, your job, doesn’t have to be earth-shattering or dramatically impactful. It just has to matter to you because you’re doing it.

Author and anthropologist David Graeber mentioned in his book ‘Bullshit Jobs’, that today’s work features a lot of needless busywork and it’s preventing people from making a meaningful contribution to the world.

Maybe the modern quest for future unemployment comes from the fact that many jobs seem meaningless and unfulfilling. However, I have been wandering with this topic of ‘meaningful’ and ‘meaningless’ work for quite some time now. Like, is my job really bullshit?

For the longest time, I have lived my life arguing that most jobs are meaningless, this includes most of my own job as well. Only after failing my first start-up and having gone through unemployment, I can safely say that the only thing worse than working is not having a job. This made me reframe my perception of ‘meaningless’.

Pleasure Gives A Sense Of Purpose

During the time of my unemployment, I had all the time to reflect on my own thoughts and actions. For many years, I have asked myself daily whether my job has meaning or a sense of purpose. I was breaking my head trying to find a fulfilling answer, but I eventually came to the point of “No, but I did have fun.” It’s weird but that thought was quite uplifting.  

Looking back on my previous jobs, I actually did enjoy them and of course some more than others. Eventually, enjoyment is what got me to start writing, because I get pleasure from writing which gives me a sense of purpose. I initially thought that the job itself gave me a sense of purpose, but it’s not. It’s the pleasure of work that gave me a sense of purpose.

Yes, that’s right, pleasure. In the moment of doing, meaning doesn’t matter, just the task at hand. That’s a break from my usual thought dwelling on the bigger picture of who I’m meant to be and what I should try to achieve in my life. When I’m working, I’m doing what’s needed.

When you perform your task well, you’re successful in your own way, big and small. That feels temporarily great despite that you may not change the world, but your approach to it makes a meaningful difference in how you and those your work with feel.

Puzzle Of Survival

Ryan Avant argues in The Economist’s 1843, that the pleasure of work lies partly in the process of losing oneself in a puzzle with a solution on which other people depend. He believes that the average wage service workers don’t have access to the same kind of pleasure. The puzzle we’re all constantly solving is survival, ideally by minimising both friction and conflict and maximising positive relations.

For example, when a hotel staff opens the door and offers to carry your heavy luggage to your room. Even though it doesn’t change the course of humanity, but it sure is nice and it makes you appreciative of the person doing the job. The staff earns a wage by solving the puzzle of packing and carrying and hopefully making their share of the world run smoothly.

There’s dignity in doing whatever must be done and having the appreciation for occupation.

However, work isn’t completely satisfying when you’re paid a lot and feel a bit arrogant about your wonderful position. Low-paid work may be undervalued societally, but it’s critical to everyone, and we all know it. Every job has some possibilities, but sadly not recognised by snobs.

In Need To Make A Living

John Danaher shared an interesting view in The Philosopher’s Magazine, saying that all this talk of jobs and purpose is exactly the problem with postmodern society. He defines work as “the performance of an activity for economic reward or in the hope of receiving some such reward.” Also,  believing that work is bad because many employment contracts allow employers to undermine worker freedom. However, because jobs are not securely held, workers accept this difficult position as they need to make a living.

But as anyone who has been under- or unemployed, knows that much worse than work is to worry about its absence. Stressing over how to pay for food and shelter, doubting when or if you’ll work again, and avoiding to spend money leaves little mental space for creativity and is more dreary than nagging about a boring job.

For most of us, work is necessary. Treating our working years as a kind of hell and dreaming of early retirement isn’t going to make life any more pleasurable. So, you’re better off learning to live, work, and play now.

Contract Is Key

“Clay is made into vessels; but it is on their empty hollowness, that their use depends. The door and windows are cut out to form a house; but it is on empty space, that its use depends. Everything is shaped by nothing,” according to Lao Tzu, a Taoist sage. Labour gives leisure time more quality because you push yourself on the job that makes having days off to spend time with friends, family, or even alone really enjoyable.

Besides, whatever your job, it has some satisfying aspects. Even if it only lets you pay your way, you can find ways to appreciate even the most boring job. Perhaps with time, you will find a more interesting job to spend your time working. But for now, dwelling continually in unhappiness will only build-up more unhappiness and make you less likely to find your way.

Interests aren’t inherently fixed, as Stanford psychologist Carol Dweck points out. Having a growth mindset, being open, is wiser than putting your whole being into a single passion. Even if you’re not naturally passionate about, for example serving cranky customers, or reading corporate law documents, you can discover that these parts present fascinating discoveries and solutions as well.

What I want you to think about is that your work, your job, doesn’t have to be earth-shattering or dramatically impactful. It just has to matter to you because you’re doing it.

Originally published at ye-chen.com.

Do you have a different view on this topic? 

Have your say in the comment section 🙂

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Exhausted

I am exhausted but happy;
I am exhausted but satisfied;
I am exhausted but don’t
Regret it;
The work I’ve done
Is rewarding;
It has solved a problem
That we faced
Because of IDPs.
Do you know what IDP means?
Internally Displaced Persons;
We have received some IDPs
And have been making provision
To accommodate them;
That has kept me busy,
Until I am exhausted.
But I don’t complain;
We owe them
A duty of hospitality;
And that is what we are doing
With plenty of joy.
Thus, though exhausted, I am fine.

We Millennials Don’t Want Jobs, We Want Lives

Me looking up.

We’re in the year 2018, and the topic on ‘Millennials are hard to manage’ is still getting thrown around. As a Millennial myself, I’m often hearing complaints from business owners and executives about our work ethic, such as we’re hard to manage, we’ve got no commitment and no drive whatsoever. Furthermore, there are many articles out there saying that Millennials just won’t work, we’re lazy, and think we’re entitled to a job.

We get it. Back in those days where employers had the “take it or leave it” attitude and employees had the “deal with it” attitude with just about every job, people were happy to have a job and they did whatever they had to do to keep it. That’s an understandable view, however, it’s also largely incorrect – time is changing.

 

Millennials Want Lives

Like it or not, Millennials are needed for the success and sustainability of your business. If you want to attract and retain the right talent, you need to start thinking fundamentally different and face a new reality. Don’t solve the issue by offering more interesting jobs. Millennials don’t want jobs. They want lives.

According to Jamie Gutfreund (Chief Strategy Officer) of the Intelligence Group, Millennials will represent 40% of the total workforce by 2020. Let this sink in for a moment.

Additional important findings on Millennials are:

  • 64% say it’s a priority for them to make the world a better place.
  • 72% want to be their own boss, but if they do have to work for a boss, 79% want their boss to be more as a coach or mentor to them.
  • 88% prefer a collective work-culture instead of a competitive one.
  • 74% want flexible work schedules.
  • And 88% want work-life integration where work and life are blended together, which isn’t the same as work-life balance.

Millennials are strategically searching for opportunities to invest in an organisation where they can make a positive difference, preferably one that itself makes a positive difference. This is a certain lifestyle centred around freedom in making choices for themselves and showing a sense of independence.

With the technology nowadays, anyone can do anything with the right tools and aspirations. It has never been easier to work for ourselves or any other organisation, no matter where we live.

 

Redefining Work

Instead of focusing on squeezing whatever you can out of the Millennial workforce before they move on in two to three years, you need to stop and listen. We’re not shy about telling you what we want. Our way of looking at the world and life is often misunderstood by older generation managers.

We aren’t entitled – we are empowered. We want more out of life, and we will get a lot of what we are seeking. This doesn’t make us better or worse, it just means that life is different now. We are growing and evolving. We don’t buy into the concept of sitting at an empty promise desk for eight to ten hour a day trying to look busy for a boss. We see a bigger picture, leveraged by technology. This means the ability to add meaningful value from anywhere at any time.

Regardless of what you think you can get out of Millennials in the short run, it is outdone by the benefits of a long-term relationship filled with ambition, creativity, collaboratives, passion, tech-savviness, and cultural awareness.

So, here are four ways to attract and retain the best of Millennials for your organisation.

 

1. Creating An Entrepreneurial Culture

72% of Millennials want to be their own boss. This means working when, where and how you like as long as results are delivered. At the same time, it offers flexibility and freedom, and removes discussions around the dead concept of work-life balance. With technology nowadays, work and life look the same. Being your own boss not a job, it is a lifestyle.

If you embrace the Millennial entrepreneurial spirit and build an internal culture to support, rather than step all over it, they don’t feel the need to leave your organisation to fulfil this desire. Anyhow, results are all that really matters at the end. By giving them the flexibility and freedom, where possible, to be their own boss with a focus fully on results. In long-term, this produces greater employee engagement, loyalty and ultimately better business results.

 

2. Having A One-Team Mentality

88% of Millennials prefer to collaborate instead of competing with others. There are still many organisations whose employees spend more time competing internally against themselves instead of their external competition. Millennials don’t want to work in such an environment, but they’re interested in working together to make the world a better place. An organisation that truly embraces and lives a “one-team” mentality will attract and retain the best of Millennials.

 

3. Caring For People’s Success

A step towards attracting and retaining the best of the Millennial workforce and organisational improvement is the recognition that people’s lives matter. Organisations are not special, but how they care about the success and health of their people is. It’s important for organisations to understand that creating a successful life for its people can maximize their engagement and business results. This ultimately leads to their ability to change the world.

Supporting the life success of your employees requires leaders and managers who take on the role of strong coaches and mentors. They should focus on both short- and long-term career and personal development. 79% of Millennials say this is important to them.

 

4. Communicating Higher Reasons

It’s key that both the Millennials and you know how the required work is having a positive impact on the world. This thoughtful consideration is what will excite them and the next-generation workforce and where true value adds up when it comes to engaging people, fulfilling purposes, and driving business results.

Most businesses are not established with the purpose to make money. They started for a higher reason. Know your industry and organisation’s purpose. Know how you make the world a better place. If you can’t connect the dots, Millennials will look elsewhere. 64% of Millennials say it’s a priority for them to make the world a better place.

 

We Are Who We Are

If leaders and managers effectively communicate and align both organisational and employee purposes, organisations will experience greater employee and customer engagement, and greater business success.

We Millennials are interested in work; we are not lazy; we don’t think the world owes us a living; we want more out of life and we want to leave the world a better place because we live.

Originally published at ye-chen.com.

  • What is your opinion on Millennials?
  • What is your opinion on organisations nowadays?
  • How is your experience with Millennials/organisations?

Have your say in the comment section 🙂

AND if you like this blog, don’t forget to Like and Share, and subscribe to my Weekly Newsletter.

 

Love work!

Do you love your work?
Or you hate your work?
Do you love work?
Or you hate work?
Do you love to work?
Or you hate to work?
Do you work hard?
Or you are lazy?
Do you encourage work?
Or you discourage work?
Work is an unavoidable
Part of life;
None can live a good life
If the one does not work;
We must work to live;
We must love work;
We must not be tired
Of working.
Love work
And live by work.
Work is the spring of life.