“Me, Myself, and I”

A hanging photograph reflects my life, or does it? The sun’s glare creates a haze over the frame of remembrance for it looks a little vague. Faintly in the distance, reflections of my life are reduced now to an eight by ten. Who am I? I think I am nothing but a picture sitting on a shelf. My story is the same as yours – a few captured moments of smiles. The rest of your breath is consumed in some kind of drama or struggle.

I see our moments posing for the camera, but no one knows what life is like when the cameras are not rolling, right? After a lot of thought, I’ve narrowed it down… life is like moving the forest. It’s difficult at best. We must start by asking for a helping hand.

So, today, I asked the Lord to make me strong and heal my conscious mind. I started the morning in prayer as there’s no one else who can help with my struggles, except “me, myself, and I.” But suddenly, I realized the “I” in this cliché is God, not me! Yes, God is always with each of us, even in the most obscure picture of life. The selfies we surround ourselves with will only become complete after we learn it’s God who brings us to the here and now.

Subsequently, I decided to investigate the old cliché a little further. Who is me in “me, myself, and I?” I see it explicitly – me is the body, Christ’s body!

Myself is the spirit of the Holy Ghost lying deep within our soul.

Image by catholic-catechism.com.ng

The I is our wonderful and loving God, ever present in all our circumstances.

God blesses us with life, hope, and truth and the power to go forward, moving the forest we call life. The kingdom of God was born within you! God bless!

http://www.danabicksauthor.com


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10 tips to become a great writer

To become a great writer is not an easy thing. But it is not impossible either. It is at the reach of all.

Anyone who takes appropriate measures can become a great writer.

Here are 10 tips to help you become a great writer.

  1. Believe you can be a great writer
  2. Visualize yourself as a great writer.
  3. Go to school and learn how to write.
  4. Learn on your own as t home.
  5. Read a lot of good writings by great writers.
  6. Learn from others.
  7. Practice, practice and practice.
  8. Persist when it is difficult.
  9. Do not yield to discouraging messages.
  10. Pray for help to write the best you can.

No one says these 10 things are easy to do. Don’t expect anything worthwhile in this world to come easily to you. If you do these 10 things, no one can stop you from becoming a great writer.

What Keeps You From Writing?

Ink bottle on desk.For this week, I have a question that will draw in many different people with different answers.

“What keeps you from sitting down and writing?”

 What is stopping that next killer blog post, mind-blowing novel, informative white paper or life-changing e-books from pouring out of your mind and onto paper?

 

External Noises

When we decide to be writers, all sorts of criticism and judgment from others may show up. And often, we don’t recognise our uncertainties and our fears for what they truly are. They hide behind to-do lists, cloaked in victimhood and responsibility to others, disguised in blame and shame through which we are incapable of seeing ourselves truthfully.

It took me some time to realise the things that others may say or have said to me about my writing. Here are just a few things that showed up:

  • “It’s a waste of time.”
  • “There are more important things to do.”
  • “Your writing isn’t that good.”
  • “It’s too hard to be a writer, are you sure you want to try?”

 

Internal Voices

After hearing those noises, we tend to turn internally, saying to ourselves in the privacy of our own minds at our desk with no words flowing: “I want to get up and walk away from writing.” And those doubts that were at the back of your mind starts getting louder:

  • “Who cares about what I write? No one’s ever going to read this.”
  • “Am I wasting my time? I might as well give up.”

Sometimes, of course, quitting is sensible. There’s no point carrying persistently on with something that you’ve lost all interest in.

BUT often, quitting isn’t the right choice. Perhaps a week later, a month later, or a year later, you find yourself wishing you’d just stuck with writing a little longer.

 

Overcome Challenging Situations

It could be that you’re going through a difficult period of your life, such as you have very young children, or maybe you have a chronic energy-depleting illness, or perhaps you work crazy hours at your day job.

It could be that you’ve received some really discouraging feedback, such as a nasty comment on one of your blog posts, or a mocking review of your first published novel, or an unusually harsh review of your work from a writing buddy.

Maybe your dearest and nearest don’t “get” your writing and is not being supportive. There are many writers blessed with a family full of wonderful sources of support. However, there are also many writers with partners, parents or friends who see their writing as a waste of time.

None of these is easy to overcome. Some people might casually tell you that “you’ll find time for it if it’s a priority” or “ignore trolls and haters.” But of course, it’s not that easy.

 

Some Ideas That Might Help

If your life isn’t currently very well-matched with writing:

  • With your situation, what’s realistic right now? It might be that “realistic” is 20 minutes of writing after lunch, while the children are napping.
  • What can you control? If you can’t do anything about the crazy shifts you work, maybe you could change your days-off routine around, so you can write first thing.

If you’ve had some discouraging feedback:

  • Don’t force yourself to “get over it.” Give yourself a sensible time to be sad or angry about it. Maybe take a few days off from writing, get back up and move on.
  • All writers get negative feedback. It’s impossible to have one piece of writing to be right for every single reader. Scroll through any popular book online and read the one-star reviews. There is this universal rule: There’s always lovers and haters.

If your nearest and dearest don’t “get” your writing:

  • Don’t talk to them about your writing and continue to write. If they happen to interrupt, make them aware of it. If that doesn’t work, get out of the house and head to a library, café, or friend’s place where there is positivity. This leads me to the next point.
  • Get to know fellow writers. A local group is a great option if your area has one or you can create one. An online group on forums or Facebook can also be really encouraging.

 

I Can Tell You This

I can’t talk you into sticking with it, nor can I sit with you while you write and encourage you to keep going.

But I can tell you this:

That poem you’re working on could be the one bright spot in someone’s crappy day. That novel you’re writing could become someone’s favourite for years and years to come. That blog post you’ve outlined could be exactly what someone needs to finally break through a barrier. And this won’t just happen once. This will happen repeatedly.

Don’t let your fears or uncertainties rob the world of what you have to give. Become capable to see yourself truthfully.

Originally published at ye-chen.com.

“So, what keeps you from sitting down and writing?”

Don’t be shy and have your say in the comment section 🙂

AND if you like this blog, don’t forget to Like and Share, and subscribe to my Weekly Newsletter.

Another Stab at Self Motivation

Another hiatus. I apologize.

However, I am going to try some new techniques for self motivation and being consistent in my blogging/social media.

So I present the first of Daily Walks. These will be pictures from my morning walks. Since I live on a Country Road they may get interesting. One note: it has been raining a lot where I live as of late. Some days the pictures might simply be of my time and miles on the treadmill.

This was just an odd tree in the middle of the field. Maybe it will inspire someone to write a story or poem.

You can’t see it that well but this person put their satellite dish in the brush for some reason. There was another satellite dish laying on the ground a few yards away and a third dish which looked like it might be the working one. It was more in the open at the edge of their front yard.

I thought this flower was pretty. Even weeds can add color to your life.

…And Order H2O (Part Two)

Yesterday in my post I wrote about the Psychological Concept of Synchronicity as explained by Carl Jung.

Synchronicity does not have fundamental empirical evidence to support it as a “force.” This was pointed out on by reader of the post in a well written comment. However, my Buddha Quote Onepost was not about proving the existence of Synchronicity. Both the primer post and this post are to explain the concept and why I believe it is a “force”–at least in my life–despite the lack of empirical evidence.

Having laid out the bare basics of the theory my personal experience is next.

Let me start by backing up.

I apologize.  This is my third guest post on Success Inspirers’ World site.  I failed to give an introduction as I am a new writer to the site. Given this opportunity to introduce myself I also can wrap in the context and background of where my belief in Synchronicity developed.

When I first started my WordPress Blog, acliddle.blog, I talked about my Spiritual Path in a two part post.  The overall theme of my site is to share the journey of how I became a writer and how my characters’ stories continue to develop, how I continue to develop as a writer. I have been writing stories since I was in first grade.  I have had a love of reading since long before grade school. My grandfather read me nursery rhymes at bed time. Each year at Christmas time, until I was ten years old, I was coaxed into the retelling of the story of the Nativity, which I did from memory for the first time when I was three years old.  The need, the drive, the passion to be a storyteller, a writer, is in my soul.

I believe in messages. Not necessarily from an outside presence.  One way these messages manifest to me is through Synchronicity. Most of the my experiences of Synchronicity are positive and good fortune coming into my life. However, there have times which were negative, karma if one chooses the label, showing me my choice of not cursing or wishing ill on someone who had harmed me was the right choice.

The best example of karma in motion was when I was unexpectedly terminated from my position as Administrative Assistant for a Church. The pastor who was my boss had graduated from seminary and was going through the Ordination Process to be Ordained Full Clergy in June of that year.  The Church only does Ordination once a year and usually the person passes the first time. When I was terminated I was not given a reason for my termination.

Fortunately for me I have an amazing support system and was able to bounce back.

In the first six months after my departure the pastor did not pass her Ordination, had a fender bender which was bad enough the insurance opted to total her car, and broke her ankle in same accident. I wished no ill. Prayed no vengeance against my boss. I genuinely felt bad for her when I found out these things happened. She has since gone on to be ordained, gotten married and has children. Yet, at the time she wronged me, the Universe balanced the books.

For many years I believed in Serendipity instead of Synchronicity. Happy accidents.  Luck. Those times were mainly during my teens. As I matured, studied Buddhism and became more conscious of my thoughts and actions Synchronicity started to make more sense.

The Secret and The Circle touch on a version of Synchronicity. Since the 1970’s, if not earlier, the idea of Positive Thinking has become a large, almost mainstream movement. Some mock the idea, some are fanatic about it, most do whatever they can to make money off of it.

People who are fanatical, as those who are vehement critics, both miss the mark.  As a believer of a Middle Way and everything in moderation, taking the principle ideas of Synchronicity, The Secret, The Circle, and other teachings and using them to adapt my worldview is the best practice I have found.  I do not go to the extreme of shunning every sick person or sitting on my butt day in and day out without activity toward making my wish a reality.  At the same time I don’t dismiss the ideas as whimsical or vapid. Instead, I use the knowledge gained to guide my activity, making conscious choices in my actions, thoughts, and speech.

The most recent Synchronistic events happened in the last couple of weeks.  Since I am currently unemployed I have been focusing my attention back on the *Bear and Hunter* book series I co-author.  Though we are nowhere near being able to afford the making of an audiobook I like to do my research ahead of time.  So I have been looking into what it takes and how much it would cost to record and distribute.  One day I happened to catch a friend of mine at his home. We have not been able to get together and really talk for several months.  He happened to be off and his house is on the main drag of the town.  I drove by after going to the store and was on my way home.  So I got to talk to him. At the same time I have started therapy online. I talk to a counselor over the phone.  I have had three sessions at this point.

When I was a little girl my grandmother, as part of her ministry, would take me around to nursing homes and make me sing for old people. Fortunately for her I am a Leo so I wasn’t too traumatized by these memories.  As I grew older I continued to show fearlessness in front of an audience. By high school I was doing vocal lessons and in band, choir and Speech and Drama. Quite by accident (a story for a later time) I discovered I was good at public speaking and people liked the sound of my speaking voice as well as my singing voice.

Keeping all of this in mind, earlier this week on Wednesday, I was talking to my therapist.  She knows I am not working but my unemployment is not the issue I am currently tackling.  As a completely unrelated tangent (again this was only the third time we had spoken on the phone) she asked me if I had thought about doing voice over work, i.e. recording for audio books. She says I have a pleasant voice which she would pay to listen to me read one of her favorite authors so I should give it a shot.

I was looking to find someone to be the voice of our book, not the other way around.  Yet, this was an intriguing possibility my therapist had suggested.  It has potential.  The friend who I finally reconnected with the other day happens to do DJ work and has equipment and software to record and edit.

As I am writing this post, my friend is editing a sample of my recordings to post on ACX. In the span of a little over a week I had the thought of creating an audiobook, had it suggested I record audiobooks, and reconnected with a friend who has the resources to record my voice.

While this is the not the neon-lit eureka moment story to convince die hard skeptics of Synchronicity it is for me the latest example of how being conscious of the moment, of keeping a positive outlook, and of going with “gut-feeling” or “little voice” can lead to a new and good things in life.

Carl Jung, Albert Einstein, and Wolfgang Pauli Walk Into A Bar (Part One)

Jung Quote

Synchronicity is a concept introduced by the Analytical Psychologist Carl Jung in the early 1920s, full extrapolation in the 1950s, which states seemingly random events of one’s life, the “coincidences,” may have meaning even if there is no causality to those events.  Causality meaning it broad terms everything has a cause. Nothing can happening without being cause.  Synchronicity says X,Y,Z happened and it is all related even if it does not seem  to have a connection at all.

This concept is not limited to Psychology. There are parallel theories in Quantum Physics and Mathematics. Chaos Theory, brought into the mainstream partly by the character of Ian Malcolm in Michael Crichton’s Jurassic Park, discusses how there is inherent order in a system of what appears to be complete chaos. Butterfly Effect, besides being a bad movie starring Ashton Kutcher, is an aspect of Chaos Theory. The famous line quoted to sum up the idea, “A Butterfly flaps its wings in China, a rainstorm hits in St. Louis, Missouri.” (Use of St. Louis, Missouri is ambiguous.)

What seems to be a random occurrence somehow affects something else completely unrelated half a world away.

The brain categorizes automatically everyday. It is one of the defense or regulatory mechanisms the mind deploys to use and store data and stimuli without becoming overwhelmed. Finding patterns helps us make sense of the world.  When the brain cannot find a pattern or a reason behind something happening there is a momentary confusion, glitch.

When a person has a slight glitch in the information their brain receives, as to where it comes from or what it might mean, the person chooses to ignore it, writes it off as coincidence, or reads it as a sign from a High Power or Intuition. Most confused moments are not a big enough break in the mundane routine to cause much thought. Some claim the need to find causation or meaning or reasoning behind daily phenomenon is how Deities were created. Regardless, in order for the brain to function and people to continue to work, eat, breath everyday the glitches had to be minimized.

Beyond the divine, paranormal or psychology connectivity our brains need there is physical evidence of actually connectivity outside of our minds.  Ecosystems, civilizations, humans and non humans are connected in many ways. We affect each other, share the same air, water, dirt. Genetically, structurally, chemically all things, living and non, share degrees.

So there is truth to patterns.  There is truth to chaos and order. There is truth in connectivity.

Now, as for the acceptance or belief if Synchronicity the person’s belief systems come into play.

In the next part I will talk about my own experiences which have lead me to believe in Synchronicity. I also believe Synchronicity continues to work in my life to this day.

Comparison Kills Contentment

“No one makes you feel inferior without your consent.” Eleanor Roosevelt

When I knew I wanted to write on this subject, I was a little intimidated. For good reason, I believe.

To uncover and call out all the destructive forms of “comparison” in all its layers and intricacies? That’s a big task to take on, for anyone. But out of all the things we need to address to ourselves, comparison is the elephant in the room. So, here we are.

Let’s start with a little bit of reflection. How exactly do you think comparison has affected your life lately?

You are certainly not alone if the only thing comparison contributes to your life is mostly negative. Feelings of discontent, jealousy, unworthiness, and sadness often stem from when we ourselves compare our behind the scenes moments to the social media highlight reels of another.

So, why exactly do we continue to compare if it has such awful consequences?

Well, first off, because it’s easy. It’s the most second nature thing that we can do. We are always wondering how we rank with people. But, again…it would be so much easier if we didn’t concern ourselves with the constant need to be best. Why do we do it?

Is it because we feel our worth somehow increases if we have the perfect hair, the perfect teeth, the perfect job, the perfect home? Is that why we idealize those we feel do have all those things and more? Do we really think that’s the end all of living? Or is life really about who you are, first and fore most?

It’s easy to say to yourself, “yes! Life is about who you are on the inside, not the outside.” But, when it comes down to the way we live? We contradict ourselves completely, by glorifying any well dressed, rich, and beautiful person like they aren’t entirely as human as we are.

The thing is, if we base our worth on feelings of worth, we will always be on a see-saw of emotions. We will never have a firm foundation of identity and we will never grasp our real worth.

So how are we going to address this comparison monster?

By getting to the heart of comparison, and debunking every little lie it whispers in your ear.

The perfection illusion

The people we compare ourselves to seem to have it all. At least, all that we think we are lacking. Whether that be the looks we think we don’t live up to, or the travel photography we wish we could have taken in person, whether it be the friend that seems like they have it ALL together…

We all are attracted to the ultimate “if only’s” in life. If only I looked like that. If only I had that job. If only I were that outgoing ALL the time. If only I were that perfect. Every time we allow ourselves to think like this, we are bashing who we are in the worst way possible, and truthfully…undermining all the good parts about us as humans.

The truth is, the same people you may be comparing yourself to in everyday life could just as well be comparing themselves to you, just in different ways.

When have we become so harsh on ourselves that we create an observational task force on what features look better on others, than the ones we own? Or the aspects of our life that seem to be less than ideal, compared to the ideal in other people’s lives?

We are not continually in competition with our fellow man.

Believing we are in constant competition will most definitely have detrimental consequences to our own personal growth. Or at least our CONTENTMENT with our own personal growth.

Viewing life as one big competition is a mistake that threatens to take away all the potential encouragement and genuine happiness we could be feeling for others when they succeed!

All of us humans, are at different stages in growth and development. When you hit a certain age, usually many of your friends are at different stages in life. So, don’t beat up on yourself for not being at a certain stage yet, or not feeling you “have it all together” right now. Seriously, who DOES have it all together right away? We learn as we live.

When you remind yourself that you are not in competition with every person that comes along, gives you room to SUPPORT others! Be encouraging of others! Love others! It’s extremely freeing to realize this.  This struck me even more, when just the other day a friend was telling me about something new and important going on in their lives, and I got so overwhelmingly and genuinely excited for them!

They told me, “I’m so glad I could tell you and you’re excited about this! Because I told someone else and they weren’t excited. Actually, I think they were jealous.”

I thought, wow. I’m so glad I could be supportive of this friend. What IF I would’ve let the comparison game dominate? That would’ve been an awful mistake. Because the way I reacted is exactly how I would want my friends to react to excited news I would share with them! Support your friends. Be happy for them. Don’t compare. Don’t compete. (And trust me, this is coming from an athlete. You know how hard not competing is for me sometimes)!

Comparison Kills Contentment 

This was told to me by one of my favorite middle school teachers. Comparison kills contentment. I’ve carried that with me ever since then, and it has become so much more prevalent when I realized just how true it is through everyday life. Keep this knowledge with you and pull this saying out from the corners of your mind whenever you need that reminder.

Don’t ever allow yourself to feel inferior by the good qualities another soul possesses. The good qualities in another does not equal the lack of good qualities in yourself.

You yourself have a billion gifts and good qualities about you. Many you’ve yet to learn about! So, please, take the time to hone them, focus on your growth, and embrace all the unique aspects that make up yourself as a person.

There are indeed forms of healthy comparison.

Have mentors and role models before you, that exemplify a life worth living. There are indeed healthy reminders of how to live life. So, follow those healthy reminders wholeheartedly, because your life is a life worth living well.

So, how should we go forward and conquer UNHEALTHY comparison once and for all?

By following these steps every time the comparison bug starts to rear its head.

Remember to…

Acknowledge we are not in constant competition with our fellow man.

Acknowledge that we are on a unique journey and timeline of life, all our own.

Acknowledge comparison, more often than not, kills valuable contentment in our own personal growth.

Acknowledge that the existent of good qualities in another person does not equate the lack of good qualities in yourself.

I hope you can carry these lessons with you, as I try to carry them with me, as well.

A lot of times a writer writes something important like this, they are writing from experience, and they are also writing to remind themselves. So, you are not alone in this journey called life!

I wish you all the best and that you live a life content in the progress you are making.

Until next time,

Hannah

If you are at all curious at to the blog that this post came from, here’s the link below! Check it out!

https://wordsmithobservations.wordpress.com/