The Season of Jesus

 

The Season of Jesus cover

I give you the sun that breaches through the frosted foliage.
I give you the peace of the morning light as cumulus lay resting high above and harmony wakens.
I give you the fortitude to rise, and you can thank my Father your alive, one and all.
And I give you the aptitude to know right from wrong.
I give you ME as you’re reminded every Sunday as I died for you. But I, too, celebrate the day my father called me to live and reign inside of you!
Whatever your interpretation of me, I appreciate being honored. If “giving“ is your primary reason, then I have succeeded. As I have done for you, I pray you will continue to reciprocate. Celebrate my birthday–it is a Christmas tradition! I’ll celebrate your heartfelt love as you remember Me, with your loved ones and friends, joining hands in commemoration.
~~~My love, Jesus

Enjoy the Christmas sound of “Immanuel” sung by Michael Card

Yes, “Jesus is the reason for the season”! Whether your faith finds you boggled up in religious wonders or abstaining from the hum-drum of outdated customs, Christ remains in Christmas. It’s said that we see Jesus in people we know and more this time of year than any other. I wish Christmas played a part in every heart, of every season!

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Christmas – a time for peace and joy. Lay down your swords! Love your fellowman! As children of God, His light shines equally.

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Christ came to save the meek, not the flamboyant. Be not discontented nor overwhelmed in money problems and material things for they, alone, will not bring you true happiness.

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Because of sin, God sent his only son, Jesus, down to earth to sacrifice his very life in our place as an offering unto the Father. The is the only way you can be saved – through Jesus.

What will be your most precious gift this Christmas? Acknowledge your sin (rebellion) that keeps you on the wrong side of the bridge, confess it and turn from it. Then allow Jesus to lead you safely over the bridge to a promising relationship with God.

Yes, this is the season for us to acknowledge Jesus! Let us rejoice in His love and mercy!

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Paying Homage at Christmas

Paying Homage at Christmas cover

I’m not racist or blasphemous, as I’d like to believe we are all men of God. That being said, there’s a piece of history I’ve stumbled upon I want to share with you. As the war broke out over Germany, America felt compelled to help by joining forces with the UK. This is common knowledge but what I’d like to share is a little-known history, not readily available. I won’t rewrite the books on WWII, but I want to give credit where credit is due.

As Hitler ensued his killing mission during the Holocaust, Germany showed little mercy for the Jewish people. A good many Jewish community inhabitants went underground to escape his horror. A lot of them were prominent and educated. Most were musically inclined and so thankful for the Christians who fought for them. So, they composed commemorative songs. They were not just any tunes, but Christmas songs, the melodies we grew up with and know, today, by heart.

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I will uncover the truth. Jewish conductors wrote and composed the best-known Christmas carols! Let’s show them gratitude and give thanks for they hoped to write lyrics Americans would remember every holiday season. The Jewish composers found these carols uplifting and joyful, in contrast to Hanukkah hymns written in minor keys and more solemn. Christmas songs became a national celebration for all faiths.

Image of Johnny Marks

Image of Livingston and Evans

Image of Irving Berlin

Nearly 50% of our favorite lyrics, today, are the proceeds of a rejoicing Jewish people. Here’s a list of just a few of the Christmas carols and their Jewish composers:

“Winter Wonderland”
1934, composed by Felix Bernard and Richard B Smith. Made famous by Bing Cosby

“White Christmas”
1942, composed by Irving Berlin (who also wrote “God Bless America” in 1938)

“Let it Snow”
1945, composed by Jule Styne (Julias Stien) and Sammy Cahnn (Sammy Cohen)

“I’ll Be Home For Christmas”
1943, composed by Walter Kent and Jerry Vale. Made famous by Bing Cosby
Little known fact: American songwriter, Buck Ram copyrighted a song with this same title in 1942, though it’s lyrics were completely different than the Christmas song.

“The Christmas Song (Chestnuts Roasting On An Open Fire)”
1945, composed Mel Torme and Robert “Bob” Wells
Fun Fact: This song was written in July in the middle of a desert

“The Little Drummer Boy”
1941, composed by Katherine K. Davis, Henry V. Onorati, Harry Simeone

“Rudolph The Red-Nosed Reindeer”
1939, composed by Johnny Marks

“Rockin’ Round the Christmas Tree”
1958, composed by Johnny Marks

“We Need a Little Christmas”
1966, composed by Jerry Herman

“Silver Bells”
1950, composed by Jay Livingston and Ray Evans

“A Holly Jolly Christmas”
1964, composed by Johnny Marks

These songs are just a small sample of how the Jews graciously contributed to the Christian’s Christmas holiday. Today, we need to give a special thanks and remember their heritage comes from a more somber background. The Jewish songwriters greatly deserves our love for the Christmas holiday. My prayers this year is to share this homage. We are all men of God, regardless of our religion.

Christ has risen if only in our hearts!

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Please be sure to join us again on Tuesday, November 27th for another “Everything Christmas Blog”!


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A Personal Thanksgiving Message…

My sanctuary is barren on this tranquil day for the winter cold has taken its toll on our summer blooms. But even so, it feels good to sit outside and reflect on another year almost gone.

It’s Thanksgiving, and I can’t think of a better time than right this minute to thank God for his many blessings. My eyes water; perhaps it’s the sunlight, or is it because I’m so humbled? This is not boastful, but reverently I will admit how great my life is since I gave it to the Lord.

My wife and I fought hard last year. No one would guess how far fifteen dollars an hour stretched when two people, so in love, pulled together. But, God knew, and that’s all that mattered.

This past year has had some difficulties too. First on the agenda was finding a new home – not here in the Midwest but on the East Coast instead. It could not be just any house but the one God intended for us. Then, we needed a new car. I’m afraid both our vehicles saw better days. Once again, God stepped in and arranged a deal of a lifetime.

If that were not enough miracles, my wife and love of my life, finished nine years of my writings. She developed them into my recent book, “There In God’s Grace” and made my narratives come alive, bless her heart. How do you ever thank God for this miracle?

So, I sit in the bright sunlight this morning and count my many blessings one by one. Another year of miracles is far beyond my expectations. Rest assuredly, I will say a “Thank you” grace at dinner tonight; thanking God foremost for the gifts, he bestowed us. Oh, we so appreciate our friends and family – some new, some gone, but it’s made us stronger every day.

In the new year, I’ll count the days until I do not have to work a job anymore. I’d much rather retire and enjoy my life with my sweetheart. Thanks so much to all of our acquaintances and followers for you, too, are part of what formed my miracle. I hope, in some little way, I will continue to help you build your own bond with our Father in heaven. God bless you this holiday and keep God first! Blessings will follow, I promise!

Breaking Bread

Breaking Bread cover

It was early morning, and I smelled the aroma of pumpkin and turkey as I walked into the kitchen. Loaves of bread were cooling on the counter. The beginning of the holy season was here. It was a time to give thanks to all those who made the year a little easier for us; dear friends and family, and most of all, for the multitude of blessings from our Lord.

Enjoy this beautiful Thanksgiving rendition of “What I’m Thankful For”:

Shorts and T-shirts changed to football and wrapping gifts. Trees lost their summer foliage, and the wet, black bark stood somberly, against shades of gray. Embers in the fireplace were still aglow from the prior night. The house shifted into a winter wonderland.

We started the day off right – sipping coffee in bed along with the morning news, and then the Thanksgiving parades. Later, my wife scurried about the kitchen donning an old-fashioned apron. The family will be here soon – my favorite time of the year!
The bread rose, moist and golden brown; perfect for a holiday tradition. I lovingly watched her focus on perfection. Cradling the loaves onto an empty shelf, she closed the refrigerator door and spun to her right. A smile flashed across her face. “Jesus is in our kitchen!”

Gasping in His glory, my wife turned to the counter and reached for the last loaf. She handed it to Him gently and then pulled out a chair. He smiled and reclined, gesturing me to do the same. Breaking bread and sipping the wine from our crystal goblets, we spoke of our blessings for this communion of three!

Breaking Bread verse

Jesus appeared on this holiday with never a word. He was the brightest of bright shining at our table – the sacrament of life. And as He arrived, so He left; only a broken twig laid upon the dinner table where we broke bread. Tears streamed down my wife’s face as she took His napkin and wiped her cheek. I’m sure He is in heaven smiling and preparing a special place for her.

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We set the table in silver and gold and plugged in the charger plates. A centerpiece of memories – holly, and pinecones adorned the table. I lit the candles as the doorbell rang; the holidays were in full swing! My wife, smiling ear to ear, carried out an extra chair for us from the bedroom. She greeted the kids with a great big smile and a huge hug as well! We celebrated that joyous Thanksgiving with love in hearts for each other and our wondrous Father, Jesus Christ.

Will you invite Him to your Thanksgiving meal this year? May you and your family have a blessed holiday and spread the cheer!

Please join us again on Sunday, November 25th for another “Everything Christmas Blog”!


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Losing Sight of Christmas

Losing Sight of Christmas cover

Enjoy “The Christmas Shoes” by Newsong 2000!


The muddy slush piles up against curbs and trampled footprints scatter about on the snow-covered sidewalks. Storefronts capitalize on impending Christmas shopping with festive, decorated windows. Full of alluring ideas that tax the mind where wallets won’t permit, it’s hard to swallow. But, love consumes our hearts, so we become obsessed with not wanting to forget a single person. We shop online and by foot comparing prices, then wait in long lines. Frustrations mount as, sometimes, we end up paying for overnight delivery because we ran out of time.

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Are we losing sight of Christmas? We join together bearing gifts for one another to commemorate Jesus’s birthday on the 25th day of December. But where did the idea of excessive gift-giving come from, anyway? It’s not how this holiday began because there was a time when celebrating this day was a taboo.

 

Origin of the Christmas Holiday
Jesus’s birth was categorized as a pagan holiday. It is their belief He never existed as a man, only as a spiritual entity. Then, in the 1600s, Rome became the birthplace of Christmas as we know it; so, it’s a fairly new celebration. But, as history reveals, Protestants (the Puritans) in America hated this holiday and banned it in 1644. They believed it was an insult to God to honor a day associated with ancient paganism. The Puritans also considered Christmas trees and decorations unholy rituals as well as traditional foods such as mincemeat pies and pudding.

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Pagan Christmas image courtesy of Huffington Post

 

Commercialism of Christmas
So, how did Christmas ever come to the point of being the ultimate gift-giving experience instead of the rejoicing of a holy birth? Perhaps the commercialization of Santa Claus bearing bags of gifts started the dreaded Christmas creep. New York City’s annual American International Toy Fair is held in February, and the stores purchase and scheme for the following holiday. Isn’t that a little much?

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Do you know a whopping 18% of gifts given to others are never used by the recipient? To make matters worse, we spend the next six months paying off the debt we incurred because it was ‘the thought that mattered.’ Scroogenomics author, Joel Waldfogel, summed it up well – “if the spending we engage in doesn’t produce any satisfaction, then it’s hardly a measure of well-being.” Why are we allowing the commercialism of Christmas to affect our purses and create greediness?

 

Make Your Christmas Count!
I think this Christmas we should, instead, get involved with our communities. Spend money, if you must, giving to those less fortunate. There are orphanages, Senior Citizen centers, hospitals, and homeless people who would appreciate your gift. Take your children with you and let them feel the happiness of another person smiling over an unexpected present. After all, as a Christian, God expects us to help others in need.

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Image courtesy of YouTube

Overloading our own kids and others with presents is not the reason for the season! Limit your immediate family gifts to three and make them count. The birth of Jesus should be our celebration. Attend a local church service and enjoy the sensations of the joyous season. Jesus was born to save us – let that be enough for you this year.
God bless and Merry Christmas!

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Please join us on Thursday, November 22nd for another “Everything Christmas Blog”!


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No More Montgomery Wards

No More Montgomery Wards cover

It was a cold Friday morning, and my mother promised to take me to see Santa the day after Thanksgiving. The winds howled, and flurries flew, but we bundled up and headed out, anyway. Twenty-five more days till Santa arrived on Christmas morning. I was so excited!

The parking lot was full of cars. We had little choice than to drudge our way through the frozen elements. My small arms pushed so hard to open the enormous glass doors for my mom while she closed her umbrella. Suddenly, it was like walking into a fairyland of twinkling lights. Everywhere I looked animated animals and snow-covered gingerbread houses lined the mall’s entrance. I used to wonder who had to climb way to the top of the Christmas trees to decorate them for they were as high as the sky.

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In the middle of all the garland and tinsel, a sweet baby Jesus laid crying and waving this arms. Mary and Joseph stood over His cradle attending to His needs. Joseph’s hand was on Mary’s back, comforting her, as she reached for a blanket to keep her newborn warm. Those animated characters were so real to this young boy! What an incredible memory!

No More Montgomery Wards Pic 1

 

My head was full of enthusiasm as we walked the corridor passing Santa’s sleigh and reindeer. They were chained up and ready to take off at any second making my head full of wonderment. And then, inside the entrance of Montgomery Wards, was the moment I’d been waiting for all year long. Bigger than life, and right in front of my eyes, was Santa Claus! A line of impatient children was dying, like me, to climb up on his lap and tell him all about their life story.

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Those yesteryears of bearing the frozen elements and fighting the crowds to get a good look at our Savior and a sneak peek at Santa are all but a myth. The large department stores, like Montgomery Wards, and malls of my youth are now replaced by high-end strip centers. I reflect with sorrow in my heart; my grandchildren will never have the privilege to remember the Friday after Thanksgiving as I did as a child!

The first snow was inside a mall, and baby Jesus reminded us of the reason. Santa waited to reward us for being good little girls and boys. Oh, those were the incredible days – going to the mall with Mom while Dad took things out of the attic, preparing for the season. Lost in thought, can we ever forgive the system which brought us miracles like 34th Street downtown? Why did they ever shut down those glorious days?

Now we sit in a leather-back, with pumpkin pies in our lap, and watch the parades on television as they light up the city. I’d give my eyeteeth to take my grandson, along with his father, to see Santa and walk those same corridors. We would laugh and celebrate a tradition through the eyes of a child.

I pray the day will come when we can stop and appreciate the love instilled us through generations of parents who cared not to change our holiday season. Let the effervescence of Christmas traditions roll on. Thank you, Mom and Dad, for never letting me forget.

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Be sure to join us again on Tuesday, November 20th for another “Everything Christmas Blog”!


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Circle of Eternal Life

Circle of Eternal Life cover

Several years ago, I visited Williamsburg, Virginia at Christmastime. I walked the streets of this historical town, and it amazed me how preservationists kept the buildings true to the colonial period of the 18th-century city. If you never visited America’s roots during the holidays, it should go on your bucket list.

Enjoy the music of the Galway Christmas Singers, “Deck the Halls”!

Part of the charm of Williamsburg was the authentic decorations used to recreate a true Christmas era. The most magnificent was the elaborate wreaths hanging on every door. I’m sure they are made by professional designers now, but what a site to see! Every item used to decorate them are from sources in nearby areas, such as shells from the nearby James River, coffee beans, dried native plants, drumsticks, fruit, and straw. I returned home with a camera disk filled with pictures of these beauties.

 

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Williamsburg, VA Christmas wreaths

I’m always amazed at the creativeness of people! How do they come up with their ideas and what was their initial inspiration? Artistic talents seem to be evident in wreaths as far back as the Persian empire. I wonder how they figured out making a round circle of dried plants delivered a beautiful headband? It seemed to work because soon after, the Greeks, in 776 BC, constructed round wreaths of olive leaves worn by the winners of the Olympic Games. Yet others wore laurel or oak leaf headpieces to designate a person’s status and rank in society.

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Olympic Games laurel headbands circa 776

Soldiers in the Roman Empire inserted the first bits of decorations into wreaths using fresh holly. They thought this plant had magical powers so using it kept evil spirits away from their homes. The trend of receiving good luck from wreaths moved forward into Europe as the wheat circles, now hanging on doors, brought good luck to their harvests. It was a sure sign of growth and accomplishment for the Europeans.

During the Renaissance period, in England, wreaths symbolized political and religious alliances. The Lutherans initially created the Advent wreath in Germany. They used evergreens, signifying everlasting life through Jesus, and large, circular shapes implying a God with no beginning and no end.

“O God, by whose Word all things are sanctified, pour forth Your blessing upon this wreath and grant that we who use it may prepare our hearts for the coming of Christ and may receive from You abundant graces. We ask this through Christ our Lord.”
~~St. Jerome Catholic Church~~

The country of Poland created wreaths of grain plants, fruit, and nuts for their Harvest Festival called Dozynki. When the construction of this “circle of eternal life” was complete, they walked to a church to be blessed by a priest. God now sanctified their harvest for the new season.

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Poland’s Dozynki wreath celebration. Image courtesy of Polish Heritage Awareness Society.

And so, wreaths for holidays became a household inspiration and custom. Today, the wreath is used in many celebrations, but most important at Christmas. For Christians, it is the preparation of the coming of Christ. Will you hang one on your door this year?

There is always a welcome invitation at our doorstep. We believe in God and the Immaculate Conception, so we honor Him by displaying a wreath of goodwill. God bless all who take the time to read and share our posts.

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We wish you all the best holiday season from the bottom of our hearts. Merry Christmas and a very blessed New Year! ~~Dana and Anne

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It Smells Like Christmas!

It Smells Like Christmas cover

Oh, the sweet smell of Christmas! As it stimulates the sensory buttons, it also expands the visible waistline, but who cares, right? It’s the holidays, and it’s time to bake the best foods of the season – cookies (defined as small cakes)! So, just how did this 10,000-year-old medieval holiday phenomena get started? After all, Christmas celebrations always revolve around food. Let us feast now on the gingerbread cookie before the famine of the dreaded post-holiday diet begins in January.

Enjoy the festive tune of “Christmas Cookies” sung by George Strait!

Gingerbread was brought to Europe in 992 by an American monk and baked in the Scandinavian countries. Wooden molds were created for the dough in the image of saints and other religious characters. As a result, gingerbread served a religious purpose through the 17th century when it became a part of Christmas. This classic treat made of ginger, cinnamon, nutmeg, mace, and molasses still tastes strikingly similar to the Middle-Aged recipes. They were expensive to make and considered a delicacy, so only the wealthy could afford to give this delicious food away as gifts of good cheer. However, I will bet those cookies were not in the shape of men! Who came up with this idea?

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Wooden cookie molds used for gingerbread dough

 

The first person to try gingerbread men was none other than Queen Elizabeth I of England in the 16th century. She hired a royal gingerbread maker who designed the shape of foreign dignitaries for a dinner party. It was part of a scheme – say clever diplomacy, because Britain stood opposite Catholic France and Spain in a religious war. What better way to attract good tidings than to bake a caricature in their honor?

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During the time of the Queen’s reign, gingerbread men were also fed to folk-medicine practitioners. They created the cookies as love tokens for young women who ate them with the hope a man would fall in love with her. I wonder how many dozens of cookies a woman ate to carry out the act of marriage? Nuremberg, Germany later picked up on the romance of gingerbread and created heart-shaped cookies with romantic messages. They now hold the oldest gingerbread recipe, dating to the 16th century, in the Germanic National Museum.

Some countries also believe the little men made of ginger root has a religious undertone. Since men are more toddler-shaped than adult stature, they represent the baby Jesus at Christmas. The spices used to make the cookie represent the exotic gifts of the Magi.
As gingerbread entered America, many recipes expanded into different kinds of desserts. George Washington’s mother, Mary Ball Washington, produced the first Gingerbread Cake in 1784. The recipe, shown below, will use every single bowl in your kitchen so prepare to spend a whole day baking and cleaning dishes. But for our readers who enjoy historical food, this will be so worth the effort!

It Smells Like Christmas recipe

This image may be difficult to read on a cell phone. Please feel free to email us at a_bicks@yahoo.com for a full version of the recipe.

Soon after Mary Washington’s release of her cake, gingerbread houses became a favorite pastime. These delightful little creations became particularly admired as Christmas decorations for the German population of Lancaster County, Pennsylvania. The witch’s candy cottage in the fairytale, Hansel and Gretel, inspired the design of these houses. Today, they are a work of art. It requires building a prototype of the house out of paper or wood first, then baking at those specifications. There is no better place to witness the ingenuity of these bakers than in Asheville, North Carolina at the National Gingerbread House Competition.

Yes, it smells like Christmas! Let us use the tasty treats and desserts this holiday to show hospitality to strangers and demonstrate fellowship to believers. It doesn’t have to be gingerbread but any kind of special treat. Give the gift of community and affection.

Happy baking and Merry Christmas!

Come back for more “Everything Christmas Blogs” on Thursday, November 15th!

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A Christmas Celestial Event

A Christmas Celestial Event cover

A perfect scene… a star like none other, sitting above a stable in the peaceful night and it’s announcing the birth of a holy Messiah. The Gospel of Matthew was the only book in the Bible which described “The Star of Bethlehem” occurrence:

A Christmas Celestial Event verse

What did the wise men witness in the sky that night? Was it real? Was it a star, a comet, or something else? The magi were skilled astrologers and scholars, so their fixation was not in the stars, but on large astronomical events which they believed would predict something happening. But why were they the only men to witness and describe a star guiding them? If they were well trained then why didn’t they understand what they saw in the sky?

Many astrologers of 2,000 years ago, the Chinese, Korean, and Babylonians, documented the heavens because they placed predictions based on events. The writings recorded then, are in a constant review by our astronomers today, and theories abound. But, one thing is for sure, no answer or explanation for this divine incident is clear. Here are the details I discovered, and you may come to your own conclusion.

Enjoy the beautiful song, “Star of Bethlehem”:

I know little of astronomy, but for certain, stars do not move relative to themselves. Planets continuously shift through the solar system. Based on this, how, then, did the sacred star move, leading the magi to Bethlehem? One theory suggests a heliacal rising. The planets Jupiter and Venus lapped each other while moving through the background stars. If the sun caught up to one of the planets, the planet would disappear until the sun moved far enough away from it. Then it would reappear shockingly bright in the sky, just before sunrise. Historical records show this exact occurrence on April 17 of 6 BC to December 19 of 6 BC. But, this natural alignment of planets, sun, and earth would not create a long, extended tail to the ground such as the one described by the magi.

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A heliacal rising

A second theory suggests a comet. This seems to be the most logical explanation because it can hang over a city or land mass as did Halley’s Comet on March 8, 1986. Historical astronomy records revealed a tailed comet in the timeframe of the magi’s travels, and it lasted for seventy days. However, from Jerusalem’s vantage point, the comet would have been in the southern sky with the head close to the horizon and the tail pointing upward. The magi described the “Star of Bethlehem” as one they never seen before and comets were frequent visitors in their galaxy. So, as scholarly astrologers, why couldn’t the magi tell the difference between a comet and a star? Apparently, something confused their decision.

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Image of Halley’s Comet

A final theory suggests the birth of a star, known as a nova. It certainly matched the biblical description. Once again, Chinese historical records reveal a new star was born in the northern constellation of Aquila in 4 BC. During the time the three wise men traveled from Jerusalem, the star would have lit their sky south into Bethlehem and not in the west. This explains why no one else witnessed this bright star. However, the star did not move, and it certainly didn’t stand over the city of Bethlehem; nor would it have stayed bright for the one to two years they took to find Jesus.

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Image of Supernova

Revealing all the facts described in this blog, I will stand on my own theory. The Star of Bethlehem was an incredible act of God and one created for a unique purpose. God can use natural law to carry out His will because He is not bound by the laws He created for this world. When you think of the whole miraculous event of Jesus’s birth, a special star is not beyond His scope. What do you think?

Please join us again on Tuesday, November 13th for another, Everything Christmas Blog!


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Birth of the Christmas Greeting Card

Birth of the Christmas Greeting Card cover

It’s the mid-1800s in the United Kingdom, and Sir Henry Cole had a remarkable idea to share “Good Tidings” among his friends. His friend, John Horsley, was the artist who designed that very first Christmas greeting card for him. He designed approximately one thousand cards to be given to special friends and family. The very first creation by him was not liked by many because it showed a child being given a glass of wine. But the idea progressed despite an even bigger problem – how he would get them to all his recipients?

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Image of John Horsley’s first Christmas postcard

Though delivering a package was costly, and the poor could never afford such an expense, Sir Henry created a “Penny Post” in town for folks to drop off their cards, thus, the creation of the post office. So, for about a Penny stamp, “Robin Postmen” (in tribute to the bird) distributed their mail for the holidays, even on Christmas day. As this tradition spread in 1860, Christmas cards were mass produced, and the postage dropped to a half-penny.

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Courtesy of United States Catalogue

The original cards were colorful with pictures of children caroling or nativity scenes. Some cards were decorated with snow scenes and red robin birds. This tradition expanded to America in 1849 as adopted by Louis Prang. He was a German immigrant that grew up in the printing business. He started the fad of Christmas cards in the United States.

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Louis Prang, courtesy of New York Historical Society

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The first known ‘personalized’ Christmas Card was sent in 1891 by the famous sharpshooter, Annie Oakley.

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First known Victorian Christmas card

In 1915, a poor, high school dropout named Joyce C. Hall gathered postcards and sold them to drugstores, bookstores and gift shops in Kansas City, Missouri. He soon realized what a lucrative business Christmas postcards was, so he purchased an engraving firm and mass produced the greeting cards in our country. This man was the founding father of the infamous company we’ve learned to count on for the holiday season – the original creator of Hallmark cards!

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I find it very interesting that the Christmas card industry gave birth to the post office. Who would have thought, much less in the UK?

Enjoy the song, “An Old Christmas Card”:

I hope as we pray for peace and joy this holiday season, God fills your heart with good tidings and cheer! Today, it doesn’t cost a cent to share those feelings with others. Have a wonderful love-filled Christmas!

Please join us again on Sunday for another, Everything Christmas Blog!

 


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