Good Morning! #Jul27

https://apostlespeaks.wordpress.com/2019/07/27/good-morning-jul27%f0%9f%98%8a/

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Why are we here? (Be inspired today 80 by Ngobesing Suh Romanus)

Why are we here?
Do you know?
Can you ssy
Why we are here?
It’s thrilling;
We are here
To inspire you
To succeed;
We are here
To inspire you
To love your work;
We are here
To inspire you
To enjoy the world;
We are here
To inspire you
To love others;
We are here
To inspire you
To be hardworking;
We are here
To inspire you
To be kind;
We are here
To inspire you
To be humble;
We are here
To inspire you
To be confident
Of yourself;
We are here
To encourage you
To be strong
And keep going;
We are here
To motivate you
To persist
When the going
Is hard;
We are here
To inspire you;
We are here
To motivate you;
We are here
To encourage you;
We are here
To help you
Be the best person
You are meant to be.
We are here
To inspire you
To be everything
That is good.
We are here
To inspire excellence
In the world.
Read about us;
know us better.

Real failure in life

You have a God-given purpose
In this world;
What God created you for is
Your God-given purpose.
It is your duty to know
This purpose;
And do all you can
To fulfill it.
If you do not know it,
You cannot accomplish it;
Or fulfill it;
Then it can be said you have failed in life,
Real failure in life is
When you fail to fulfill
The purpose
For which God created you.
Have you discovered what God created you for?
Search for your purpose.
Ask your maker in prayer
To tell you.
And do not stop asking
Until he has told you.
Then spend all your time,
Your energy, your might,
Pursuing that purpose.
Do not pursue a wrong purpose;
A wrong purpose
Is a goal that is different
From what God created you for.
If the world is so chaotic,
It is because many people
Are running after the wrong purpose.
Many have abandoned what God created them for
And are pursuing something else.
If we each pursued only our God given purpose,
The world would be a place of love, peace and harmony. Those who fail to pursue or fulfill their purpose,
Are a liability not an asset to the world.
That is true failure.

The Contrast Of Loving Your Job

A man doing his job.

Author and anthropologist David Graeber mentioned in his book ‘Bullshit Jobs’, that today’s work features a lot of needless busywork and it’s preventing people from making a meaningful contribution to the world.

Maybe the modern quest for future unemployment comes from the fact that many jobs seem meaningless and unfulfilling. However, I have been wandering with this topic of ‘meaningful’ and ‘meaningless’ work for quite some time. Like, do I love my job? Is my job really bullshit?

For many years, I have lived my life arguing that most jobs are meaningless, this includes most of my own job as well. Only after failing my first start-up and having gone through unemployment, I can safely say that the only thing worse than working is not having a job. This made me reframe my perception of ‘meaningless’.

The Pleasure Of Work

During the time of my unemployment, I had all the time to reflect on my own thoughts and actions. For many years, I have asked myself daily whether my job has meaning or a sense of purpose. I was breaking my head trying to find a fulfilling answer, but I eventually came to the point of “No, it was neither meaningful nor fulfilling, but I did have fun.” It’s weird but that thought was quite uplifting.  

Looking back on my previous jobs, I actually did enjoy them and of course, some more than others. Eventually, enjoyment is what got me to do what I do now, which is writing. And because I get pleasure from writing, as a result, it gives me a sense of purpose. I initially thought that the job itself gave me a sense of purpose, but it’s not. It’s the pleasure of work that gave me a sense of purpose.

Yes, that’s right, the pleasure of work. In the moment of doing, meaning doesn’t matter, just the task at hand. That’s a break from my usual thought dwelling on the bigger picture of who I’m meant to be and what I should try to achieve in my life. When I’m working, I’m doing what’s needed.

When you perform your task well, you’re successful in your own way, big and small. That feels temporarily great despite that you may not change the world, but your approach to it makes a meaningful difference in how you and those your work with feel. Of course, people share different views on whether the pleasure of work is meant for everyone.

Puzzle Of Survival

Ryan Avant argues in The Economist’s 1843, that the pleasure of work lies partly in the process of losing oneself in a puzzle with a solution on which other people depend. He believes that the average wage service workers don’t have access to the same kind of pleasure. The puzzle we’re all constantly solving is survival, ideally by minimising both friction and conflict and maximising positive relations.

For example, when a hotel staff opens the door and offers to carry your heavy luggage to your room. Even though it doesn’t change the course of humanity, but it sure is nice and it makes you appreciative of the person doing the job. The staff earns a wage by solving the puzzle of carrying your luggage and hopefully making their share of the world run smoother.

There’s dignity in doing whatever must be done and having the appreciation for occupation.

However, work isn’t completely satisfying when you’re paid a lot and feel a bit arrogant about your wonderful position. Low-paid work may be undervalued societally, but it’s critical to everyone, and we all know it. Every job has some possibilities, but sadly not recognised by snobs.

In Need To Make A Living

John Danaher shared an interesting view in The Philosopher’s Magazine, saying that all this talk of jobs and purpose is exactly the problem with postmodern society. He defines work as “the performance of an activity for economic reward or in the hope of receiving some such reward.” Also,  believing that work is bad because many employment contracts allow employers to undermine worker freedom. However, because jobs are not securely held, workers accept this difficult position as they need to make a living.

But as anyone who has been under- or unemployed, knows that much worse than work is to worry about its absence. Stressing over how to pay for food and shelter, doubting when or if you’ll work again, and avoiding to spend money leaves little to no mental space for creativity and is more dreary than nagging about your boring job.

For most of us, work is necessary. Treating our working years as a kind of hell and dreaming of early retirement isn’t going to make life any more fun. So, you’re better off learning to live, work, and play now.

Contrast Is Key

“Clay is made into vessels; but it is on their empty hollowness, that their use depends. The door and windows are cut out to form a house; but it is on empty space, that its use depends. Everything is shaped by nothing,” according to Lao Tzu, a Taoist sage. Labour gives leisure time more quality because you push yourself on the job that makes having days off to spend time with friends, family, or even alone really enjoyable.

Besides, whatever your job, it has some satisfying aspects. Even if it only lets you pay your way, you can find ways to appreciate even the most boring jobs. Perhaps with time, you will find a more interesting job to spend your time working. But for now, dwelling continually in unhappiness will only build-up more unhappiness and make you less likely to find your way. Even if you’re not naturally passionate about, for example serving cranky customers, or reading corporate law documents, you can discover that these parts present fascinating discoveries and solutions as well.

What I want you to think about is that your work, your job, doesn’t have to be earth-shattering or dramatically impactful. It just has to matter to you because you’re doing it.

Author and anthropologist David Graeber mentioned in his book ‘Bullshit Jobs’, that today’s work features a lot of needless busywork and it’s preventing people from making a meaningful contribution to the world.

Maybe the modern quest for future unemployment comes from the fact that many jobs seem meaningless and unfulfilling. However, I have been wandering with this topic of ‘meaningful’ and ‘meaningless’ work for quite some time now. Like, is my job really bullshit?

For the longest time, I have lived my life arguing that most jobs are meaningless, this includes most of my own job as well. Only after failing my first start-up and having gone through unemployment, I can safely say that the only thing worse than working is not having a job. This made me reframe my perception of ‘meaningless’.

Pleasure Gives A Sense Of Purpose

During the time of my unemployment, I had all the time to reflect on my own thoughts and actions. For many years, I have asked myself daily whether my job has meaning or a sense of purpose. I was breaking my head trying to find a fulfilling answer, but I eventually came to the point of “No, but I did have fun.” It’s weird but that thought was quite uplifting.  

Looking back on my previous jobs, I actually did enjoy them and of course some more than others. Eventually, enjoyment is what got me to start writing, because I get pleasure from writing which gives me a sense of purpose. I initially thought that the job itself gave me a sense of purpose, but it’s not. It’s the pleasure of work that gave me a sense of purpose.

Yes, that’s right, pleasure. In the moment of doing, meaning doesn’t matter, just the task at hand. That’s a break from my usual thought dwelling on the bigger picture of who I’m meant to be and what I should try to achieve in my life. When I’m working, I’m doing what’s needed.

When you perform your task well, you’re successful in your own way, big and small. That feels temporarily great despite that you may not change the world, but your approach to it makes a meaningful difference in how you and those your work with feel.

Puzzle Of Survival

Ryan Avant argues in The Economist’s 1843, that the pleasure of work lies partly in the process of losing oneself in a puzzle with a solution on which other people depend. He believes that the average wage service workers don’t have access to the same kind of pleasure. The puzzle we’re all constantly solving is survival, ideally by minimising both friction and conflict and maximising positive relations.

For example, when a hotel staff opens the door and offers to carry your heavy luggage to your room. Even though it doesn’t change the course of humanity, but it sure is nice and it makes you appreciative of the person doing the job. The staff earns a wage by solving the puzzle of packing and carrying and hopefully making their share of the world run smoothly.

There’s dignity in doing whatever must be done and having the appreciation for occupation.

However, work isn’t completely satisfying when you’re paid a lot and feel a bit arrogant about your wonderful position. Low-paid work may be undervalued societally, but it’s critical to everyone, and we all know it. Every job has some possibilities, but sadly not recognised by snobs.

In Need To Make A Living

John Danaher shared an interesting view in The Philosopher’s Magazine, saying that all this talk of jobs and purpose is exactly the problem with postmodern society. He defines work as “the performance of an activity for economic reward or in the hope of receiving some such reward.” Also,  believing that work is bad because many employment contracts allow employers to undermine worker freedom. However, because jobs are not securely held, workers accept this difficult position as they need to make a living.

But as anyone who has been under- or unemployed, knows that much worse than work is to worry about its absence. Stressing over how to pay for food and shelter, doubting when or if you’ll work again, and avoiding to spend money leaves little mental space for creativity and is more dreary than nagging about a boring job.

For most of us, work is necessary. Treating our working years as a kind of hell and dreaming of early retirement isn’t going to make life any more pleasurable. So, you’re better off learning to live, work, and play now.

Contract Is Key

“Clay is made into vessels; but it is on their empty hollowness, that their use depends. The door and windows are cut out to form a house; but it is on empty space, that its use depends. Everything is shaped by nothing,” according to Lao Tzu, a Taoist sage. Labour gives leisure time more quality because you push yourself on the job that makes having days off to spend time with friends, family, or even alone really enjoyable.

Besides, whatever your job, it has some satisfying aspects. Even if it only lets you pay your way, you can find ways to appreciate even the most boring job. Perhaps with time, you will find a more interesting job to spend your time working. But for now, dwelling continually in unhappiness will only build-up more unhappiness and make you less likely to find your way.

Interests aren’t inherently fixed, as Stanford psychologist Carol Dweck points out. Having a growth mindset, being open, is wiser than putting your whole being into a single passion. Even if you’re not naturally passionate about, for example serving cranky customers, or reading corporate law documents, you can discover that these parts present fascinating discoveries and solutions as well.

What I want you to think about is that your work, your job, doesn’t have to be earth-shattering or dramatically impactful. It just has to matter to you because you’re doing it.

Originally published at ye-chen.com.

Do you have a different view on this topic? 

Have your say in the comment section 🙂

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You need to know why God created you

 
You need to know why God
Created you;
God did not create you,
And put you here on earth
For nothing.
He was not wasting his time
When he created you;
Can you imagine God
Wasting his time?
Not at all;
All that God does is important;
He created you for a purpose.
He created you with a mission in mind;
That you should carry out a mission
In this world;
And when you accomplish that mission,
He moves you to the next world;
There are people who know
What their mission is;
They know why God created them;
What God put them here for;
They know it and go for it;
There are many others who have no idea
What their mission is;
What they are here for;
As a result,
They follow the wrong path;
And you can be sure such end
With wasted lives.
It is important to know
That God created you for a purpose;
And also to know what that purpose is;
When you know it, don't stop there;
Pursue it unrelentingly,
Till you get to the end.
Do you know your mission here?
Do you know why God created you?
It is easy to know;
Ask him to tell you what he created you for.
That is how you know your mission;
It is clear that if you ask God
To tell you why he created you,
He will tell you;
Actually, He knows better than anyone
Why he created you;
So go to him.




The Answer in The Forest

     The tension in Paul’s muscles made every breath labored. He sat there looking out this window questioning his very existence. The yellow trees of fall were letting loose their leaves onto the forest floor that surrounded his small one bedroom cabin.  Paul questioned every decision he had made. 
     His laptop’s screen glowed into his fallen face. Paul saw nothing but despair around him. His book sales had died off, and he felt like he had been hidden in the abyss. Paul had followed the advice of some of the most successful people in his life. He had worked day and night. Everything should have resulted in resounding early success.
     Paul looked up at the ceiling. The old logs were almost black with age. Splinters, gashes, and scrapes covered much of the wood, but the roof was solid. Paul spoke towards the ceiling, “Why, God? I thought you wanted me here. I thought you gave me stories to share. It’s like I don’t exist. Is that your idea? Am I really this useless? No income, no hope, no readers?”
      The computer’s lid gave Paul little resistance as he closed it. Paul knew his body was too broken to enter the rat race once more. Paul mumbled to himself, “Run with the big dogs or stay on the porch.” A smile traced across his taut face. He remembered a time when he not only ran with the big dogs, he led them. Paul let out a long sigh and stood up.
     The cabin’s old wooden floors creaked under his weight. Although Paul could feel small dips in the wood, there was no sign of structural rot as he paced laps around the open living room and kitchen. Plates would rattle whenever he drew near the hutch with its shelves of blue patterned platters and plates. Paul knew he was going nowhere fast, but he needed to expel the anxiety and stress that had built up inside.
     A wooden bolt held the cabin’s only door in place when it had a resident inside. Age and seasons had swollen and shrank the pin and the sleeve. Now a temporary resident was required to wiggle and cajole the wood into place when they wanted the door locked. The same process had to be employed when a vacationer wished to be set free. A sliding latch, also of wood, then had to be set free through a wiggle of the front door to coax it loose.
     Paul managed to get himself into the open air after a few seconds of wrestling with the front door. He sat in a nearby chair on the front porch and let the cold air of the late fall flow over his body. The cold breeze seemed to wash away the tension it found as it blew over his body. Paul looked out at the woods and spoke into the woods, “What am I supposed to do? I’m ruined.”
     “That sounds a bit dramatic.”
     Paul startled. He turned to see a brown bearded man with a broad smile. He was not a large man, Paul guessed around five feet eight inches, maybe five feet nine. His green flannel shirt and dirty jeans gave him the look of an old lumberjack. Without asking permission is sat down next to Paul and reached over and patted Paul’s hand.
     Paul wanted to pull his hand back, but for some reason allowed the stranger to continue. Something was comforting and familiar in his touch.
     “I’m sorry, do we know each other?” asked Paul.
     The stranger looked him straight in the eye. Paul thought his brown eyes looked plain, but they had a twinkle that was hard to miss. The stranger replied, “You know me better than you think. I was just watching you in the cabin. You know, the answers you seek have been in front of you this whole time.”
     “You were watching me?” Paul asked in an alarmed voice. A shiver flowed down his spine. “Who are you?”
     The stranger responded, “Paul, how have you become so blind? The wood, Paul. It’s all around you.” The stranger swept his arm across and around as he spoke. “Both alive and dead, these trees serve a purpose. When they are alive, they convert CO2 to oxygen so you can breathe. Their beauty gives a sense of peace, and when they are harvested, they provide shelter.”
     Paul shook his head, “I don’t understand. So are you saying I’m dying, but I have a purpose?” The question shot a bolt of fear through him. He wondered once more what this stranger’s intentions were.
     The stranger’s eyes seemed to suddenly lock Paul’s attention. Paul felt pulled towards this frightening man with no name. The stranger continued, “Paul, stop looking for answers in your mind and look at what you’re seeing. The wood is scarred, it’s going dormant, and one day the leaves will sprout again. The trees will spread their pollen and seeds and not only live but reproduce. Yet, the scars and knots are going to remain. All this dead wood that makes the cabin has rested from its known existence, and yet it provides shelter to troubled travelers looking for peace.”
     Paul nodded and scowled as he attempted to respond, “So, you’re saying all the scars I carry on my body, and all this stress and anxiety that are a burden to me have a purpose. Are you saying that even with my weakness and despair my life still has a purpose?”
     The bearded stranger smiled, patted Paul’s hand, stood and walked off the porch. He looked back at Paul as he rounded the corner of the house, “Now you understand.” Then the stranger disappeared from view.
     Paul pushed himself out of his chair and quickly made his way around the corner of the house. There was nobody there. Paul did laps and could find nobody. The cold seemed to cut through Paul’s body, and he shivered. A Bible verse popped into Paul’s head, “If you seek me you will find me.” 
     The answer had been there the whole time. Paul knew he was not alone, and he knew what he needed to do. Paul made his way back into the cabin. He tossed another log into the woodstove and returned to his computer. He needed to keep writing because his role in this life had not ended yet.

God’s plan for your life

woman in black coat

Photo by Christina Morillo on Pexels.com

Let’s look at  where you are going;
Let us look at God’s plan for your life;
Do you know God’s plan for your life?
Have you discovered why God created you?
Do you know who God created you to be?
Do you know what God created you to be?
Do you know where God created you to go?
Do you know what God created you to do?
If you know God’s plan for your life,
Spare no effort to realize such a lofty plan;
No accomplishment can equal that plan’
Let alone surpass such a plan for your life.